Hollywood at Home: Dita Von Teese Shows Off Her Antique-Filled Bedroom

07/21/2013 at 06:09 PM ET

DITA VON TEESE WAS PHOTOGRAPHED AT HER HOME IN L.A.
Greg Lotus

Her recipe for design: Sugar and spice, and everything nice.

“People always say, ‘Oh, she lives in another era,’ ” says burlesque dancer and fashion designer Dita Von Teese of the Hollywood home she’s filled with antiques and vintage collectibles.

“But it’s not true. I just love to be surrounded by things of glamour and beauty.”

In fact for 25 years Von Teese (a self-proclaimed “aesthetic control freak”) has painstakingly curated an array of curios: classic pinup art, rare burlesque memorabilia and … stuffed birds?

“I collect antique or ethical taxidermy – meaning the animals died naturally. I think they’re beautiful.”

To properly house her extensive collection, Von Teese, 40, gave her five-bedroom pad a “complete makeover,” converting two bedrooms into closets and wallpapering nearly the entire home.

“I can’t stand modern, white interiors,” she says. “IKEA is my worst nightmare! “

FILED UNDER: Home , Stars & Chefs

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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