Black Magic! Throw a Stylish, Adults-Only Halloween Party

10/10/2013 at 06:23 PM ET
1 of 7
Yagi Studio/Getty

This October 31, orange isn’t the new black. For a goth-inspired party, ditch the bright side of Halloween’s classic color duo and stick to jet-black decor illuminated only by candlelight. The creepy-chic look is sure to haunt guests long past midnight.

Rebecca Hansen Photography

“Make simple, store bought desserts feel special by sticking to an eerie color palette,” says Abby Larson of Style Me Pretty—so anything chocolate goes. With a white chalk pen and black construction paper,  label each platter with a spooky name. Some of Larson’s suggestions: Vampire Bites, Ghoulish Ganache and Dark Chocolate Magic.

Courtesy The Purple Pumpkin Blog

Making these mummy lights couldn’t be simpler. Save the jars from pickles, jam or any glass-contained foods, clean them out and you’re ready to go. “I wrapped some bandages around them, tying up at the back, stuck on a couple of googly eyes and popped in a candle … done!” says Michelle Ordever of The Purple Pumpkin Blog.

Rebecca Hansen Photography

To make these table decorations, Larson scoops up some leaves from her backyard, spray paints them black and writes “trick” or “treat” with a white chalk pen. “You could leave them like this, or you could turn it into a game by adding fun trick or treat ideas on the back,” she says. “A trick might be that the guest has to convince another guest that they are related to Elvis. A treat may be that the guest gets a special goodie bag as the evening comes to a close.”

Courtesy Talk of Tomatoes

It’s not a Halloween party without a signature spooky cocktail. Janelle Maiocco of blog Talk of Tomatoes used black licorice strings to create the illusion of creepy-crawly spider legs. Try this trick on any drink, or try her Drunken Spider cocktail. To make, combine 2 parts creme de cassis, 3 parts vodka, 1 part Triple Sec, 1 part lemon juice and 1 part pomegranate juice in a cocktail shaker—that’ll be enough for two pours, Maiocco says. So you’re not playing bartender all night, leave out the ingredients and a recipe card so guests can mix their own.

Rebecca Hansen Photography

“Have a handful of cool, classic masks on hand for guests that opted out of dressing up,” Larson says. To save cash, buy inexpensive black masks at a party store, and dress them up by doodling swirls with a silver glitter pen and attaching a large black feather.

Rebecca Hansen Photography

Remove the labels from old wine bottles to create one-of-a-kind candleholders. For that extra Halloween touch, let the candle burn for about 2-3 hours before the party starts, Larson advises. “The wax drips will give the bottles an eerie but elegant vibe,” she says. “When used en masse, they are seriously stunning.”

Share this story:

Your reaction:

The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms


Stay Connected


Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content


The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

Posted on

On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

Add A Comment reserves the right to remove comments at their discretion.

Showing 1 comments

Gema Standlee on

Hi, all the time i used to check webpage posts here in the early hours in the morning,