Classic vs. Low-Cal: 10 Thanksgiving Dishes for All Diets!

11/26/2013 at 10:13 AM ET
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Left: Courtesy MyRecipes; Right: Courtesy Cooking Light
DINNER IS SERVED!

Some Thanksgiving recipes are meant to butter you up; others take the road less buttered.

No matter what combo of rich and light dishes you prefer at your feast, you’ve got options. Piece together your perfect menu with traditional Turkey Day dishes from our sister site MyRecipes and slimmed-down versions from Cooking Light‘s new cookbook, Lighten Up, America: Favorite American Foods Make Guilt-Free. No matter which you choose, they’ll all leave you feeling full, happy and satisfied!

Left: Courtesy MyRecipes; Right: Courtesy Cooking Light
STUFFING

Both of these yummy stuffing recipes are packed with Italian sausage and apples, but the light version (on right) does not include butter and uses less meat to pare each serving down to just 180 calories and less than 6 grams of fat.

Click HERE for the classic recipe, and HERE for the low-cal version.

Left: Courtesy MyRecipes; Right: Courtesy Cooking Light
SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE

Cooking Light’s sweet potato casserole (on right) does not have any processed sugar, lowering each ½-cup serving to about 200 calories—but the marshmallow topping still makes every bite sweet and ooey-gooey. Or go for the full dose of brown sugar and crunchy corn flake topping (on left)!

Click HERE for the classic recipe, and HERE for the low-cal version.


Left: Courtesy MyRecipes; Right: Courtesy Cooking Light
PUMPKIN PIE

Both pies pack vitamin-rich pumpkin! The lightened-up slice (on right) uses skim milk instead of heavy cream to slash fat and calories, while the decadent version (on left) has a crumbly, homemade gingersnap crust.

Click HERE for the classic recipe, and HERE for the low-cal version.

Left: Courtesy MyRecipes; Right: Courtesy Cooking Light
CORN PUDDING

Take a bite and you won’t be able to tell that the lightened-up corn pudding (on right) is made with skim milk and reduced-fat cheese to reduce its calorie count to 178. But if you’re from a family of dairy purists, you better go for the classic corn pudding (on left), rich with extra-sharp cheddar.

Click HERE for the classic recipe, and HERE for the low-cal version.

Left: Courtesy MyRecipes; Right: Courtesy Cooking Light
MASHED POTATOES

If you’re looking for the king of decadent mashed potatoes, the traditional recipe (on left) includes heavy cream, sour cream and butter. (Yum!) The trimmed-up taters (on right) get most of their savory flavor from spices—salt, pepper and fresh chives—to cut each ½-cup serving down to just 115 calories and 4 fat grams.

Click HERE for the classic recipe, and HERE for the low-cal version.

—Marissa Conrad

FILED UNDER: Food , Health , Pumpkin , Recipes , Thanksgiving

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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charlotte on

Thanksgiving is all about overindulging while spending time with family and friends. I plan to go all out and not skimp on any of the calories, but the recipes are good options.