WATCH: Celeb Chefs Predict What’s Next in Food

02/21/2014 at 12:08 PM ET

Ali Rosen is the host and founder of Potluck Video, a food and drink website that takes you behind the culinary scene with celebrity chefs, restaurateurs, producers, mixologists and more.

We’re two months into 2014 and chefs are still talking about what they think you’ll see on the table before the year’s out.

It seems like we should all be ready for an extra dose of veggies: Chef Daniel Boulud of N.Y.C.’s Restaurant Daniel thinks vegetables may appear more often as the star of the plate, rather than as a side.  Top Chef Masters alum David Burke had the same idea: “This is a year of a vegetable breakthrough.”

On a similar note, Boulud believes chefs will have “much more concern with the environment and where the food comes from, how the food is raised [and] how the food is prepared before we prepare it.”

Other chefs diverged from produce. Food Network’s Alex Guarnaschelli thinks cooking shows will go back to basics, while wd~50’s Wylie Dufresne thinks restaurants will go the opposite way: a return to fine dining.

No matter what, we’re confident these chefs will keep turning out top-notch food. To hear all of their predictions, watch the video above.

FILED UNDER: Food Blog , Potluck Video

Share this story:

Your reaction:

The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

People

Stay Connected

Subscribe

Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content

Archive

The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

Posted on

On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

Add A Comment

PEOPLE.com reserves the right to remove comments at their discretion.

Showing 3 comments

Georgiana Esteban on

how to get rid of arm fat

http://www.XzqJPRFCea.com/XzqJPRFCea

Chong Potempa on

Josphine Zepka on