The Easiest Oatmeal Cookies Ever From Momofuku Milk Bar’s Christina Tosi

04/23/2014 at 11:25 AM ET

Christina Tosi Momofuku Milk Bar Champagne Cookies
Courtesy Christina Tosi

Ali Rosen is the host and founder of Potluck Video, a food and drink website that takes you behind the culinary scene with celebrity chefs, restaurateurs, producers, mixologists and more.

A traditional oatmeal cookie is a classic choice for any baker. But with Christina Tosi’s recipe, you get an addictive spin on the classic.

The Momofuku Milk Bar baker is known for shaking up standard recipes, adding in everything from coffee to potato chips to cereal. But for this cookie she’s not straying too far from the original — the recipe is an adaptation of her grandmother’s version.

It’s a particularly sentimental for the chef because she believes she “got [her] start cooking alongside her grandmother.” One of Grandma’s best secrets includes rolling the dough in confectioner’s sugar before baking. It gives an extra dose of sweetness to the cookies and, Tosi adds, it also “provides a really cool crackle coating.”

But she also has a secret ingredient of her own. Watch the video below to find out what it is:

Grandma’s Oatmeal Cookies
Makes 1 dozen

1 stick plus 6 tbsp. butter, at room temperature
½ cup granulated sugar
¾ cup light brown sugar
2 large eggs
2 tsp. vanilla extract
2 cups flour
2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
¾ tsp.  salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. baking soda
¼ cup shredded coconut
2 cups confectioners sugar

1. Heat the oven to 350°F.

2. Combine the butter and sugars in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and cream together on medium-high for 2 to 3 minutes, until fluffy and pale yellow in color.

3. On low speed, add the eggs and vanilla extract, and increase the speed to medium­ high and beat for 1 to 2 minutes, until the sugar fully dissolves and the mixture is a pale white.

4. On low speed, add the flour, oats, salt, cinnamon, baking soda and shredded coconut. Mix for a minute, until your dough comes together and any remnants of dry ingredients have been incorporated.

5. Pour the confectioners sugar into a bowl. Using an ice cream scoop, form balls of dough, roll them in the sugar and place them on a parchment-lined baking sheet.

6. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the tops have lightly crackled. Remove and allow to cool on a baking rack.

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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