You Can Do This: Make Chic Wall Art with Lipstick!

05/27/2014 at 03:17 PM ET

Kiss Artwork Style Me Pretty
Courtesy Style Me Pretty

We don’t usually kiss and tell, but we want the world to know about our latest love: This whimsical DIY wall art from Abby Larson of Style Me Pretty. It’s as simple as applying your favorite lipstick and layering on some smooches to create a one-of-a-kind design.

“It’s sexy, and something that looks great in any style home,” Larson tells PEOPLE of the piece made by peppering a white art board with color-coordinated kisses.

Choose a few shades in the same family for the right pop of color—we’re starting with deep berry, the “it” hue for fall according to our beauty gurus on the StyleWatch team. Larson’s advice: “Include one very pale color and one very dark color for impact. And reapply after every two kisses.”

For inspiration, just pretend it’s Robin Thicke!


Lipsticks in a few shades


16” x 20” smooth white art board (available at craft stores)

Masking tape

Cardboard, a few inches larger than the art board on all sides

White 16” x 20” picture frame


1. Use the masking tape to secure a cardboard border around your art board. Hold the board by those cardboard edges so you don’t leave fingerprints.

2. Apply the lightest lipstick shade to your lips. In a thick coat, kiss the center of the board, repeating as many times as you want. Don’t be concerned where you place the impressions or what they’re shaped like—they’ll quickly get drowned out by the brighter colors. Figure out which puckers you like best and experiment!

3. Wipe off your lipstick thoroughly with a tissue and repeat Step 2 with another lipstick color, working your way up from lightest to darkest.

4. Gently remove the masking tape and place the art board in the frame. Hang on your wall and admire your handiwork!

FILED UNDER: Expert Tips , Home

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms


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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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canvas art austin tx on

Artists have for hundreds of years indulged their fantasies.
To print an image lithographically, the flat surface of the stone plate is
roughened slightly—etched—and divided into hydrophilic regions that accept a film of
water, and thereby repel the greasy ink; and hydrophobic regions that repel water and accept ink because the surface tension is greater on the greasy image area,
which remains dry. Animators were able to create
drawn art in a computer-generated 3D space, after it was developed
for use in the 1999 film Tarzan.

The Quiet Trendsetter on

Reblogged this on The Quiet TrendSetter and commented:
Pretty sweet DIY

Jerri on

I did something similar to this a year ago and now the lipstick is starting to fade. Is there a way to seal the color on the canvas?