In Memory of The Brady Bunch’s Ann B. Davis: Make Pork Chops and Applesauce

06/02/2014 at 03:05 PM ET

Ann B. Davis as Alice on The Brady Bunch
ABC Photo Archives/ABC/Getty

In real life, Ann B. Davis, who played beloved housekeeper Alice Nelson on The Brady Bunch, couldn’t cook. But that didn’t stop the actress, who died on June 1 at 88, from pretending she was a pro in the kitchen on the classic TV series.

Viewers watched Alice fake-make everything from pot roast to chocolate-chip cookies, often surrounded by the six hungry Brady children.

And one dish that she prepared on-screen with help from Brady mom, Carol (Florence Henderson), became one of the famous catchphrases of the sitcom: pork chops and applesauce.

In a classic 1971 episode, Peter Brady — who thinks he needs a more exciting personality — asks what’s for dinner and is told “pork chops and applesauce.” He repeats it, using a tough-guy accent a la legendary movie actor Humphrey Bogart. Davis offers up her own bad Bogart impression, clenched teeth and all, as she tears lettuce into a bowl.

You might not cook in a groovy avocado-and-orange kitchen like Alice, but you can prepare a Brady-style meal with a pork chops and applesauce recipe from, featured below.

Or for a more modern version, try Elizabeth Hurley's Pork Chops and Baked Apples, made with white wine, brown sugar and butter.

Just make sure to eat either dish while watching classic Alice moments on The Brady Bunch: The sitcom, which ran from 1969 to 1974, now airs on TV Land.

Pork chops and applesauce

Pan-Fried Pork Chops and Homemade Applesauce
Serves 4

For the applesauce:
1 tbsp. butter
3 apples, peeled, cored and coarsely chopped, about 4 cups
½ cup water
3 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
⅛ tsp. salt

1. Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add apples to pan; cook 4 minutes, stirring frequently.

2. Add water, sugar, juice and salt to pan; cover. Cook 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until apples are tender.

3. Mash gently with the back of a spoon.

For the pork chops:
½ cup all-purpose flour
4 (5 oz.) bone-in center-cut pork chops
½ tsp. salt
⅛ tsp. pepper
2 tbsp. canola oil

1. Place flour in a shallow dish. Sprinkle pork evenly with ½ tsp. salt and pepper; dredge pork in flour.

2. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add pork to pan; cook 5 minutes or until golden. Turn pork over; cook 3 minutes or until desired degree of doneness. Serve with applesauce.

—Nancy Mattia

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms


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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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Sylvia Quintana on

To this day, when we have pork chops(no applesauce) we always have to say “pooorrrk chooopps n applesauce”. We even have our 10 yr old nephew saying it! Lol . Rip Ms Davis.

Guest on

Love that episode!!

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