Breakfast Trash Ice Cream from Ample Hills Creamery: Secrets and Stories from Brooklyn’s Favorite Ice Cream Shop

07/09/2014 at 03:18 PM ET

Breakfast Trash Ice Cream
Lucy Schaeffer/Stewart Tabori & Chang

Breakfast Trash
Makes 1 quart

For the Cereal Ice Cream:
3 cups whole milk
1 cup Cap’n Crunch
½ cup Corn Pops
½ cup Frosted Flakes
½ cup organic cane sugar
½ cup skim milk powder
1⅔ cups heavy cream
2 egg yolks

For the Fruity Breakfast Mix-In:
Butter for the baking sheet
1½ cups Froot Loops
1½ cups Fruity Pebbles
⅓ cup skim milk powder
1 tbsp. organic cane sugar
½ cup unsalted butter, melted

1. Make the cereal ice cream: Prepare an ice bath in the sink or in a large heatproof bowl.

2. In a large saucepan, heat the milk over medium-high heat until it starts to steam, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the cereals. Cover the pan and let the cereal steep for 20 minutes. Pour the mixture through a wire-mesh strainer into a bowl, pressing down on the cereal in the strainer to extract as much milk as possible. Don’t worry if some of the cereal “pulp” pushes through into the ice cream. That’s totally OK. Return the cereal-infused milk to the saucepan.

3. Add the sugar and skim milk powder. Stir with a hand mixer or whisk until smooth. Make sure the skim milk powder is wholly dissolved into the mixture and that no lumps remain (any remaining sugar granules will dissolve over the heat). Stir in the cream.

4. Clip a candy thermometer to the saucepan and set the pan over medium heat. Cook, stirring often with a rubber spatula and scraping the bottom of the pan to prevent sticking and burning, until the mixture reaches 110ºF, 5 to 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

5. Place the egg yolks in a medium bowl. While whisking, slowly pour ½ cup of the hot milk mixture into the egg yolks to temper them. Continue to whisk slowly until the mixture is an even color and consistency, then whisk the egg-yolk mixture back into the remaining milk mixture.

6. Return the pan to the stovetop over medium heat and continue cooking the mixture, stirring often, until it reaches 165ºF, 5 to 10 minutes more.

7. Transfer the pan to the prepared ice bath and let cool for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour the ice cream base through a wire-mesh strainer into a storage container and place in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours, or until completely cool.

8. Make the fruity breakfast mix-in: Preheat the oven to 275ºF. Butter a 12-by-18-inch baking sheet and line it with parchment paper.

9. In a large bowl, crush the Froot Loops and Fruity Pebbles with your hands to about half their original size. The goal here isn’t to pulverize them into dust (though a little cereal dust is OK, as it will help bind everything together later on). Add the skim milk powder and sugar and toss to combine. Pour the butter over the cereal mix and work it together with your hands, squeezing it into clumps and then breaking it apart, almost like kneading dough.

10. Spread the mixture evenly over the prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the cereal just begins to toast and turn brown. Set aside to cool completely.

11. Transfer the cooled base to an ice cream maker and churn it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

12. Transfer the ice cream to a storage container, folding in pieces of the fruity breakfast mix-in as you do. Use as much of the mix-in as you want; you won’t necessarily need the whole batch.

13. Serve immediately or harden in your freezer for 8 to 12 hours for a more scoopable ice cream.

Excerpted from Ample Hills Creamery: Secrets and Stories from Brooklyn’s Favorite Ice Cream Shop, Stewart Tabori & Chang © 2014

FILED UNDER: Dessert , Recipes

Share this story:

Your reaction:

The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms


Stay Connected


Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content


The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

Posted on

On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

Add A Comment reserves the right to remove comments at their discretion.

Showing 0 comments