5 Tips For a Better BLT

08/21/2014 at 03:17 PM ET

BLT Making Tips
Courtesy Food 52

Let’s get one thing straight: The BLT is the ultimate summer sandwich (just ask half of the Food52 team). You have crisp vegetables; juicy tomatoes; the fatty, salty crunch of bacon; and a swipe of creamy mayonnaise — all sandwiched between carb-y goodness.

That being said, there’s a certain satisfaction that comes from refining and finessing a good thing. With that spirited quest for perfection in mind, we’ve rustled up five tips for taking your BLT to the next level of sandwich domination.

1. Bake your bacon. Though there are few things as heavenly as the smell of bacon frying, there are also few things as infuriating to clean up as bacon grease splatter. Baking your bacon ensures even cooking and crispy slices, without the mess. It also keeps your bacon from curling up at the edges or burning — these imperfect slices are great for picking at, but bad for sandwiching.

The Best Way To Cook Bacon
Courtesy Food 52

2. Bake your bread, too. Freshly baked bread will make your sandwich (and really, your life) much better. Bonus points if you toast just one side of your bread slices, and make sure the toasted sides face inward. This ensures crunch while saving you from mini mouth cuts.

Spent Grain and Herb Whole Wheat Bread
Courtesy Food 52

3. Whip up your own mayonnaise. It’s easier than you think, and allows you to veer into aioli territory (just add garlic), or dial up the flavor with some pretty herbs (we love ours with basil). Make sure to spread the results copiously.

How To Make Mayonnaise Without A Recipe
Courtesy Food 52

4. Let your lettuce act as a barrier. Now that you’ve got your fatty ingredients on lock, it’s time to turn your attention to the vegetables. BLTs make great use of all that extra lettuce you’re finding in your CSA box, which also conveniently keeps your bread from absorbing the juice from your summer-ripe tomatoes or the fat from your bacon. Take your bread (toasted side-up!), smear each slice with a thick layer of mayo, and then top each with a leaf or two of lettuce. Then, sandwich your tomato and bacon in between, and there you have it: nature’s barrier against soggy sandwiches.

5. Add a little something of your own. A simple starting point like the BLT is just begging you to put your own twist on it. Arugula instead of romaine? Great call. Avocado slices? Duh. Have some fun with it — after all, it’s a sandwich, not a soufflé.

What are your best BLT-enhancing tricks? Let us know in the comments!

—Talia Ralph

This article was originally published on Food52, a site that brings cooks together to share recipes, ideas and support.

Want more stories like this?

Sign up for our newsletter and other special offers:

sign me up

Thank you for signing up!

FILED UNDER: Expert Tips , Food Blog , Lunch , Recipes

Share this story:

Your reaction:

The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms


Stay Connected


Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content


The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

Posted on

On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

Add A Comment

PEOPLE.com reserves the right to remove comments at their discretion.

Showing 0 comments