Starbucks Is Selling a Super-Rare Coffee Blend — for One Week Only

03/18/2015 at 01:32 PM ET


SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg/Getty

Are you one of those loyal Starbucks customers who orders the exact same coffee, the exact same way, every morning? Well, this is the week to consider shaking things up.

The coffee chain’s latest menu addition is Laurina, a rare blend from Nicaragua that features almond and lemon flavors and is naturally low in caffeine (each bean of Laurina has about half the amount of normal coffee beans), according to the java experts at StarbucksMelody. It’s so rare, in fact, that only 20 of the chain’s 11,000+ locations are carrying the blend — and it’s available for just a week as of Monday, March 16.

And that’s not the only limited roll out Starbucks has down the pipeline — the company announced Wednesday that its planning to launch trials of its coffee and food delivery service in the second half of 2015, but only in two markets: Seattle and in N.Y.C.’s Empire State Building.


Courtesy of StarbucksMelody

This limited selection of Laurina isn’t a product of Starbucks being stingy. The small roll out is simply a result of working with a limited supply: The company was only able to obtain a mere 17 bags of the blend. Although a coffee-curious Southerner may have a right to complain: 17 of the 20 stores selling the blend are in Seattle, with the other three in Brooklyn, Chicago, and Cambridge, Massachusetts.


Courtesy of StarbucksMelody

And, of course, for something so rare, the price is high: A half-pound bag retails for $16, while you can buy a full pound of Starbucks’ more common blends for the same price.

But if you’re really hankering to give it a try, your best bet is surely a plane ticket to Seattle, and quick.

—Diana Pearl

Share this story:

Your reaction:

Add A Comment

PEOPLE.com reserves the right to remove comments at their discretion.

Showing 0 comments

From Our Partners

Sign up for our daily newsletter and other special offers.
    Choose your newsletters
Thank you for signing up! Your request may take up to one week to be processed.
    see all newsletters