What’s the Super-Simple Secret to a Juicy Thanksgiving Turkey? Chef Wylie Dufresne Has Answers

11/23/2015 at 12:07 PM ET

Wylie Dufresne
Adam Pantozzi/Bernstein Associates, Inc./Getty

It’s easy to get wrapped up in the brining vs. anti-brining debate (these chefs certainly have thoughts on it), but the secret to a moist turkey may be far simpler…and have more to do with what you do with the bird after you cook it.

“The most important thing with turkey is to let it rest — most people don’t let it rest long enough,” chef Wylie Dufresne told PEOPLE at his Strongbow Hard Apple Ciders dinner in New York City. “It will get juicier the longer you let it rest.”

RELATED: Emeril Lagasse, Mario Batali and More Chefs Answer Your Thanksgiving Cooking Questions

Dufresne, a prominent figure in the molecular gastronomy movement and chef at the now-closed restaurant WD-50, considers himself a master carver.

“I’m always happy to help carve. I use a carving fork and a knife. First you take the legs and thighs off. Then you take the breast off and then slice the breast,” the chef said of his technique. His other Thanksgiving contribution? “I pull corks. I am happy to bring all the alcohol to your house if you want me over for dinner, but I don’t want to cook anything.”

RELATED: How to Cook the Most Awesomely #Basic Thanksgiving Spread

Dufresne is enamored with his mother-in-law’s “Pepperidge Farm-style” stuffing — “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” — and likes to fool around with it for brunch the next morning.  (There are usually quite a bit of leftovers, as she makes a whole extra batch just for him, he said.)

“For breakfast, I like to form the stuffing into a patty and sauté it with a fried egg on it,” he said. “Turkey hash is also great for leftovers.”

RELATED: 12 Epic Turkey Sandwiches to Make with Your Thanksgiving Leftovers

As for leftover mashed potatoes — one of the trickier leftovers to re-imagine — he doesn’t over-think it.

“I would take some and fold a lot of gravy into it, so it’s neither gravy nor mashed potato. It has a life there.”

—Maria Yagoda, @mariayagoda

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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