The Maker of Skittles, M&Ms and Snickers Is Removing All Artificial Coloring From Their Foods

02/11/2016 at 11:27 AM ET

Mars Inc
Otto Greule Jr/Getty

Taste the rainbow no more?

Candy giant Mars Inc. announced they will be eliminating artificial coloring from their “human food products” (the company also makes pet food). This will affect over 50 brands including M&M’s, Skittles, Wrigley’s gum, Snickers, and Twix.

RELATED: There Are 3 New M&M’s Flavors About to Enter Our Lives and Hearts

Wonder what this change will do to those beloved, brightly-colored Skittles? Well, you’ll have to wait about five years to find out. That’s how long it’ll take for Mars plans to implement the dye-free coloring to all their chocolate, gum, confection, food, and drink categories.

RELATED: Which Reese’s Candy Has the Most Peanut Butter? Here’s the Scientific Answer

“Eliminating all artificial colors from our human food portfolio is a massive undertaking and one that will take time and hard work to accomplish,” Mars Inc. president and CEO Grant F. Reid said in a release.

The candy company has stated that they will work with suppliers to identify natural alternatives while maintaining the “vibrant, fun colors” that customers expect.

RELATED: These Crazy Rainbow Bagels Are Stuffed with Cotton Candy and Funfetti Cream Cheese, Naturally

But until then, keep on tasting the (artificial) rainbow.

–Michelle Ward Trainor

FILED UNDER: Dessert , Food News

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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drgrady on

Yay! This is excellent news. Hope more food manufacturers do the same.

Guest on

Great news!