These Rainbow Doughnuts Are Guaranteed to Brighten Your Day

03/02/2016 at 11:58 AM ET

rainbow doughnuts
Moe’s Doughs/Instagram

ICYMI: Rainbow bagels launched a colorful craze in New York City back in October and has continued to reign supreme ever since—even leading The Bagel Store to temporary close due to its inability to meet the crowd demand.

But now, the tie-dye bagels have some colorful competition … in the form of rainbow doughnuts. That’s right: Vibrant colors are here to stay, but it’s the medium that’s changing.

RELATED: Is This the End of Rainbow Bagels? N.Y.C.’s The Bagel Store Has Closed Indefinitely

Moe’s Doughs, a doughnut shop located in Brooklyn, N.Y., recently launched its first multi-colored doughnut.

“We’re changing the game with this new Rainbow Cake Donut,” reads the eatery’s Instagram caption. “Just a little secret … It’s not food coloring, but it’s a mixture of your favorite cake donuts.”

RELATED: Here’s How Those Instagram-Famous Rainbow Bagels Are Really Made (VIDEO)

The new pastry has even captured the attention of Instagram’s famed foodie Food Baby.

Through the years, we’ve seen different takes on hybrid foods, such as The Bagel Store’s very own cross between a bagel and croissant, a clear response to Dominique Ansel’s Cronut.

RELATED: Hungry for More Oscars Fashion? Check Out the Stars’ Gowns Reimagined as Cookies

Tell Us: What do you think about the rainbow food trend? Are you interesting eating one? Sound off! 

—Grace Gavilanes

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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms


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The Latest Craze in Disco Styles Is See-Through Jeans—but Beware of Foggy Bottoms

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On a clear day, you can see forever—or at least that’s the wicked thought behind L.A. designer Agi Berliner’s transparent idea: see-through jeans. Exhibitionists notwithstanding, most folks wear them over bathing suits or as attention-getting evening wear with halters, garter belts and body stockings. Created for the disco crowd, the $34 jeans are selling like, well, hot pants. In just six weeks, 25,000 pairs have already been sold in such major department store chains as Macy’s, Bonwit’s and Saks.

“What’s limiting American designers is that we’re afraid to do something different,” says Berliner, 32, a Hungarian émigré who fled with her family to the U.S. in 1956. Agi thought up the gimmick in London while marveling at the way plastics were being employed by designers of punk fashion. In her L.A. office, where she designs for La Parisienne junior sportswear, Agi spent five days on the phone and six weeks testing to come up with the right plastic.

Agi herself tried out the French-cut jeans with the zipper in front, and quickly found several problems: Some plastics tore away from stitching, others wouldn’t bend and all fogged with perspiration. The ideal material proved to be a vinyl supplied by a bookbinder. The steam was eliminated with a series of vents behind the knees and in the crotch. “They’re no hotter than polyester pants,” claims Agi, “and if you wear them with tights, they won’t stick to your legs.”

Whatever the discomfort and despite the problem of Saturday night feverishness, discomaniacs report one major advantage of the plastic pants: no laundry bills. To keep Berliner’s see-through jeans clear, all the wearer needs is a little Windex.

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Showing 4 comments

Emnem on

And brighten you poop.

Mrs. B on

I love donuts, but those don’t look very appealing to me. I will stick with the plain ones.

slk on

No, don’t eat this unhealthy cr*p! Especially your children. All those dyes are so bad for children. Adults too for that matter. Keep the RAINBOWS in the sky!

Albertine Sespinosa on